Posts Tagged With: NERO WOLFE of West Thirty-Fifth Street

NERO WOLFE of West Thirty-Fifth Street – Excert concerning Fer-De-Lance

The following is an excerpt from NERO WOLFE of West Thirty-Fifth Street by William S. Baring-Gould concerning FER-DE-LANCE.

On the afternoon of Sunday, June 4, 1933, Peter Oliver Barstow, fifty-eight-year-old president of Holland University, was playing golf on the links of the Green Meadow Club near Pleasantville, thirty miles north of New York City. The round was a foursome, Barstow playing with his son, Lawrence, his neighbor, E. D. Kimball the grain broker, and Kimball’s son, Manuel.

As Barstow swung at the ball on his first drive, he uttered a little exclamation, with a startled look on his face, and began rubbing his belly. The others asked him what was wrong, and he said something about
a wasp or a hornet and started to open his shirt. His son looked inside at the skin and saw a tiny puncture, almost invisible. Barstow insisted it was nothing, but thirty minutes later, on the fairway of the fourth hole, he suddenly collapsed on the ground, kicking and clutching the grass. He was still alive when his caddy seized his arm, but by the time the others reached him he was dead.

So began the first recorded adventure of Nero Wolfe and Archie Goodwin: the case Archie called Fer-de-Lance. Wolfe was drawn into the case on Wednesday, June 7; he concluded it successfully just two weeks later, on Wednesday, June 21.

Information taken from NERO WOLFE of West Thirty-Fifth Street by William S. Baring-Gould, page 95 of Bantam paperback edition published February 1970

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The Red Box – Baring-Gould Excerpt

The following is an excerpt from NERO WOLFE of West Thirty-Fifth Street by William S. Baring-Gould pertaining to THE RED BOX.

Things were slow for Wolfe and Archie in late 1935 and early 1936. “we haven’t had a case that was worth anything for nearly three months,” Archie complained to Wolfe.

Then Molly Lauck was poisoned (hydrocyanic) on Monday, March 23, 1936, at the offices of Boyden McNair, Incorporated, on Fifty-second Street and Madison Avenue. A week later, on Monday, March 30, the theatrical producer Llewellyn Frost brought Wolfe into the case. It was one in which Archie rather enjoyed himself—the fashion models Boyden McNair employed were all very attractive girls—but Wolfe was miserable. Circumstances forced him to visit the scene of the crime, and none of the chairs at Boyden McNair fitted him; what’s more, he despised the brand of beer sold at the nearest delicatessen. Perhaps because of his physical discomfort, Wolfe solved the case in close-to-record time—on Saturday, April 4.


The above text was taken from NERO WOLFE of West Thirty-Fifth Street by William S. Baring-Gould, pages 99-100 of Bantam paperback edition published February 1970

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The Rubber Band – Baring-Gould Excerpt

The following is an excerpt from NERO WOLFE of West Thirty-Fifth Street by William S. Baring-Gould pertaining toTHE RUBBER BAND.


When it was all over, Wolfe had a bullet in the arm, and the killer of two men had one in his heart. But before the shoot-out in Wolfe’s office, he and Archie had to break a mystery that stretched across forty years and five thousand miles, a mystery in which lynching and blackmail, a devilish alibi and a warrant for Wolfe’s arrest all played a part. Anthony D. Perry came to Wolfe for help for the second time on Monday, October 7, 1935; Wolfe solved the complicated case only two days later, on Wednesday, October 9.


Information taken from NERO WOLFE of West Thirty-Fifth Street by William S. Baring-Gould, page 99 of Bantam paperback edition published February 1970

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The League of Frightened Men – Baring-Gould Excerpt

The following is an excerpt from NERO WOLFE of West
Thirty-Fifth Street
by William S. Baring-Gould concerning THE LEAGUE
OF FRIGHTENED MEN.


For Wolfe and Archie, the affair began on
the afternoon of Friday, November 2, 1934 (it came to it’s startling conclusion
on Monday, November 12), but actually it had begun in 1909, when Paul Chaplin,
the novelist, had been permanently crippled as the result of “a boyish
prank” played on him by his Harvard classmates. The classmates formed a
“League of Atonement” to help Paul, and all seemed to be going as well
as possible under the circumstances until June 1934, when a crowd of them
assembled at Fillmore Collard’s place near Marblehead, Massachusetts. Judge
Harrison had come East from Indiana for the commencement exercises at his
son’s graduation. They missed him that night, and the next morning they
found his body at the foot of the cliff, beaten about among the rocks by
the surf. To tragedy was added terror: soon thereafter each surviving member
of the league had received a set of verses boasting of the judge’s murder.
These verses could have been written by only one man: Paul Chapin.

Then Eugene Dryer, the art dealer, was poisoned, and Andrew
Hibbard, the psychologist, disappeared. And in each case there was another
set of taunting verses….


Information taken from NERO WOLFE of West Thirty-Fifth Street by William
S. Baring-Gould, pages 97-98 of Bantam paperback edition published February
1970

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