Other Things Wolfean

Inspired By Wolfe Blog

Inspired By Wolfe is a cooking blog (mostly) inspired by dishes from the Nero Wolfe series of books and the Nero Wolfe Cook Book.  There are some very good recipes and info on the site as well as a short and humorous story told in cookies:  Murder by the cook: A murder mystery told in cookies.

I’ve spent quite a bit of time browsing around and have read all the Wolfe related recipes and must say I’ve learned a lot! I tried the scrambled eggs in a double boiler last night and they were good. However as the only double boiler I have is glass and the stove (electric) doesn’t regulate well, they cooked too hot/fast so am going to have to try again. The sauisse minuit recipe sounds (and looks!) quite good! Going to see if I can find a source for Pheasant and Goose here in East Central Alabama and give it a try.

Very Satisfactory!!!

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Categories: Other Things Wolfean, The Nero Wolfe Cookbook, Wolfe Links | Tags: , , | 1 Comment

The Ortega Chronicles: The Wold Newton Universe

The Ortega Chronicles: The Wold Newton Universe

The Wold Newton Universe
On December 13, 1795, a meteorite fell from the sky and landed in Wold Newton, East Riding Yorkshire. Breadth was twenty eight inches, length was thirty six inches, and it’s weight was fifty-six pounds. This is historical fact.

Science Fiction author, Philip Jose Farmer, suggested that the meteor was radioactive. Two passing coaches were in the vicinity and the radiation caused genetic mutations in the people inside the coaches. Many of their descendants were thus endowed with extremely high intelligence and strength, as well as an exceptional capacity and drive to perform good, or, as the case may be, evil deeds. The descendants included Sherlock Holmes, Professor Moriarty, Doc Savage, one of his assistants, Monk Mayfair, The Shadow, G8, Phileas Fogg, Sir Denis Nayland Smith, Fu Manchu, The Avenger, The Spider, Nero Wolfe, Philip Marlow, Travis McGee, among others. Thus, The Wold Newton Family came to be.

Interesting concept. There is a bit more about this in the blog post this excerpt was taken from as well as a series of stories utilizing this concept on the site. Haven’t read any of them yet but am planning to asap.

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The Nero Wolfe Cookbook – 1981

I would have sworn that I had posted this wonderful cookbook before but can’t find it anywhere, so here it is, in all it’s glory!

The Nero Wolfe Cookbook - 1981 - Front Cover

The Nero Wolfe Cookbook - 1981 - Front Cover

The Nero Wolfe Cookbook - 1981 - Rear Cover

The Nero Wolfe Cookbook - 1981 - Rear Cover

The Nero Wolfe Cookbook – 1981

By Rex Stout and the Editors of The Viking Press

First published by The Viking Press 1973
Published in Penguin Books 1981

Rear Cover Text:

Nero Wolfe, often billed as the greatest detective in the world, owes much of his impressive bulk to his all-consuming interest in food. After years of pleading from faithful readers, Rex Stout, author of the more than sixty Nero Wolfe stories, finally served up this delightful collection of over 225 recipes for the fabulous repasts detailed in the mysteries. Some of the culinary concoctions are of Wolfe’s own making (the Kanawha Spa dinner, for example), but most of them have been prepared exclusively by his faithful and ingenious majordomo, Fritz Brenner, who can whip up perfect shad-roe mousse Pocahontas, corn fritters with wild-thyme honey, hedgehog omelet, or fig souffle without batting an eyelash. For the connoisseur of Nero Wolfe stories and of memorable meals, The Nero Wolfe Cookbook is sure to satisfy the most voracious and discriminating of appetites.

“What the nation has been needing (besides the five-cent cigar) is an authoritative treatise on Nero Wolfe’s feeding habits, and this book is superbly welcome.”
-P. G. Wodehouse

“The extracts from Nero and Archie are as indispensable to good cooking as those from coffee and vanilla. The book adds a new dementia to dining.”
-Jacques Barzun

Cover design by Neil Stuart
Cover photograph by WaIter Wick

Thanks Text:

Thanks

The only part of this book that is all mine is the excerpts from the stories which precede the recipes. All the dishes mentioned in Too Many Cooks were cooked twice-some three times or more- by the late Sheila Hibben and me. For years she wrote regularly for The New Yorker on food and cooking and restaurants, and she was my dear and valued friend. (A bit of her: One day in January when I was driving her to my house from the station she said, “This country is so wonderful like this, without all those goddam leaves obstructing the view.”)

Barbara Burn’s name should be on the title page. The comments and explanations in italics are all by her, as well as the final wording of most of the recipes. Without her there would have been no Nero Wolfe cookbook. She also tested, or supervised the testing of, many of the dishes. I thank her warmly.

I thank Michael S. Romano, who tested more than half of the dishes and wrote the first draft of many of the recipes. I thank Helen Taylor, who chose and collected the excerpts from the stories and tested a few of the recipes. And I thank Marshall Best and Laurie Colwin and Mary Chambers and Barbara Morris and Susan Mabon.
That’s gratitude for you!

-Rex Stout

Categories: Other Things Wolfean, The Nero Wolfe Cookbook | Tags: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

You and your Nero Wolfe recipes – cartoon

You and your Nero Wolfe recipes - cartoon

You and your Nero Wolfe recipes - cartoon

Another one that I remember nothing about. Just got my Linux box back up after several months down after the os hard drive going out and found this on the storage hard drive.

If anyone knows anything let me know in the comments.

After making several of the recipes from the Nero Wolfe Cook Book I do sympathise with her!

First – I always have to visit at least 2 or 3 stores for different things that we are out of or don’t keep in stock.

Second – the kitchen is always a disaster zone afterwards.

However, the reward IS in the tasting… 🙂

Categories: Other Things Wolfean, Wolfe Cartoons | Tags: , , | 1 Comment

Merry Christmas

Just a quick note to say Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all the Wolfe fans out there!

Not dead yet. Just way too busy to do much online lately. Will try to get back to posting new covers later in the coming year.

Dave

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Ellery’s Nero Wolfe Library Display

Ellery’s Nero Wolfe Library Display

Some fantastic displays of Wolfe memorabilia!

Nero Wolfe and Rex Stout Memorabilia Display Case

Nero Wolfe and Rex Stout Memorabilia Display Case

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RadioLovers.com – Nero Wolfe

RadioLovers.com – Nero Wolfe

There are 25 mp3s of Nero Wolfe radio shows available at this site. Good quality too!

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Nero Wolfe OTR MP3 List

Nero Wolfe OTR MP3 List

This site has a cd of mp3’s of old Nero Wolfe Radio Shows for sale. $5.00 for 27 shows. I assume that is + shipping.

They have one of them, Stamped For Murder, available for download at: http://www.otr-cat.com/otr3/nero_wolfe_501020_stamped_for_murder(otrcat.com).mp3. Please note that the link above will start the mp3 playing. Right click and save linked file as or whatever works for your system to download. This file is 6.7 mb.

I wish they made them available for download rather than on cd. or both. I’d download them now…

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Nero Wolfe’s Office

The sketch and description below are taken from the Bantam Crime Line Edition of Fer-De-Lance Published in 1992. According to the book: These items are from Rex’s archives and have never been published before.

Wolfe's Office sketch by Rex Stout

Description of Nero Wolfe’s Office

Confidential Memo From Rex Stout, September 15, 1949

The old brownstone on West 35th Street is a double width house. Entering
at the front door, which it’s 7 steps up from the sidewalk, you are facing
the length of a wide carpeted hall. At the right is an enormous coat rack,
eight feet wide, then the stairs, and beyond the stairs the door to the
dining room. There were originally two rooms on that side of the hall,
but Wolfe had the partition removed and turned it into a dining room forty
feet long, with a table large enough for six (but extensible) square in
the middle. It (and all other rooms) are carpeted; Wolfe hates bare floors.
At the far end of the big hall are two doors; the first one is to what
Archie calls the front room, and the second is to the office. The front
room is used chiefly as an anteroom: Nero and Archie do no living there.
It is rather small, and the furniture is a random mixture without any special
character.

The office is large and nearly square. In the far corner to the left
(as you enter from the hall) a small rectangle has been walled off to make
a place for a john and a washbowl — to save steps for Wolfe. The door
leading to it faces you and around the corner, along its other wall, is
a wide and well cushioned couch.

In furnishings the room has no apparent unity but it has plenty of character.
Wolfe permits nothing to be in it that he doesn’t enjoy looking at, and
that has been the only criterion for admission. The globe is three feet
in diameter. Wolfe’s chair was made by Meyer of cardato. His desk is of
cherry, which of course clashes with the cardato, but Wolfe likes it. The
couch is upholstered in bright yellow material which has to go to the cleaners
every three months. The carpet was woven in Montenegro in the early nineteenth
century and has been extensively patched. The only wall decorations are
three pictures: a Manet, a copy of a Corregio, and a genuine Leonardo sketch.
The chairs are all shapes, colors, materials, and sizes. The total effect
makes you blink with bewilderment at the first visit, but if you had Archie’s
job and lived there you would probably learn to like it.

Categories: Other Things Wolfean | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Nero Wolfe’s Office

The sketch and description below are taken from the Bantam Crime Line Edition of Fer-De-Lance Published in 1992. According to the book: These items are from Rex’s archives and have never been published before.

Nero Wolfe's Office

Nero Wolfe's Office

Description of Nero Wolfe’s Office

Confidential Memo From Rex Stout, September 15, 1949

The old brownstone on West 35th Street is a double width house. Entering
at the front door, which it’s 7 steps up from the sidewalk, you are facing
the length of a wide carpeted hall. At the right is an enormous coat rack,
eight feet wide, then the stairs, and beyond the stairs the door to the
dining room. There were originally two rooms on that side of the hall,
but Wolfe had the partition removed and turned it into a dining room forty
feet long, with a table large enough for six (but extensible) square in
the middle. It (and all other rooms) are carpeted; Wolfe hates bare floors.
At the far end of the big hall are two doors; the first one is to what
Archie calls the front room, and the second is to the office. The front
room is used chiefly as an anteroom: Nero and Archie do no living there.
It is rather small, and the furniture is a random mixture without any special
character.

The office is large and nearly square. In the far corner to the left
(as you enter from the hall) a small rectangle has been walled off to make
a place for a john and a washbowl — to save steps for Wolfe. The door
leading to it faces you and around the corner, along its other wall, is
a wide and well cushioned couch.

In furnishings the room has no apparent unity but it has plenty of character.
Wolfe permits nothing to be in it that he doesn’t enjoy looking at, and
that has been the only criterion for admission. The globe is three feet
in diameter. Wolfe’s chair was made by Meyer of cardato. His desk is of
cherry, which of course clashes with the cardato, but Wolfe likes it. The
couch is upholstered in bright yellow material which has to go to the cleaners
every three months. The carpet was woven in Montenegro in the early nineteenth
century and has been extensively patched. The only wall decorations are
three pictures: a Manet, a copy of a Corregio, and a genuine Leonardo sketch.
The chairs are all shapes, colors, materials, and sizes. The total effect
makes you blink with bewilderment at the first visit, but if you had Archie’s
job and lived there you would probably learn to like it.

Categories: Other Things Wolfean | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

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